Copyright Reform: Producers' AMP Act Introduced In Senate

(l-r) Producer David Zollo, attorney Brandon Clark, Sen. Chuck Grassley, Academy Trustee Justin Roberts, the Academy's Daryl Friedman in Bloomfield, Iowa
Photo: Courtesy of Sen. Chuck Grassley

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Copyright Reform: Producers' AMP Act Introduced In Senate

Senate Judiciary Committee now considering the three major elements of music's unified platform to modernize copyright for the present day

Advocacy/Mar 27, 2018 - 02:17 am

On March 22 Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, along with the Committee's ranking member, Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), introduced the Allocation For Music Producers (AMP) Act in the Senate. Sens. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) were also original co-sponsors.

The AMP Act would codify into law the way that producers and engineers get paid for their work. They currently can collect royalties through SoundExchange via a voluntary process but the AMP Act would codify this process in the law so that SoundExchange is obligated to pay studio professionals directly, protecting their fair share of royalty payments via legislation.  The bill is supported by SoundExchange.

"The introduction of the Allocation For Music Producers (AMP) Act in the Senate amps up momentum for passing music copyright reform legislation in Congress," said Recording Academy Chief Industry, Government & Member Relations Officer Daryl Friedman. "The bipartisan and now bicameral support for the AMP Act marks the first time U.S. legislation would protect the rights of the studio professionals who help create the essence of the recordings we love."

At the GRAMMY Week House Judiciary Committee hearing on copyright reform in January, producer and Recording Academy Trustee Mike Clink explained the importance of the House version of the AMP Act for members of his profession — which extends federal copyright protections to studio professionals for the first time. The hearing also considered others bills where there was general hope the three would be consolidated into a comprehensive copyright reform bill, including the CLASSICS Act, the Music Modernization Act and the AMP Act.

The following month, a group of Recording Academy members from, or with ties to, Iowa met with Chairman Grassley during one of the senator's constituent town hall events. The delegation of music creators explained the importance of the AMP Act as part of a comprehensive reform package, kickstarting the bill’s introduction into the Senate. With Grassley's leadership, all three reform bills now have homes in the Senate docket as well as the House. This one bill represents a great deal of progress for copyright reform because the three major pieces of legislation on which there is industry unity are now pending consideration and review in the Senate as well as the House.

There is more involved than just the three bills but the "united support" of stakeholders announced in January is the foundation for the progress lawmakers and music advocates hope to see. Issues such as satellite radio or even terrestrial radio could have some impact, but the collective effort to see real reform legislation passed this year means controversial items are more likely to be postponed for another Congress.

With positive momentum at hand, it's imperative for the music community to work together to make 2018 the first year this century that major copyright modernization is passed into law.

Tell Congress To Support Comprehensive Music Reform

A Letter To Our Recording Academy Members And To Our Colleagues In The Music Industry

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A Letter To Our Recording Academy Members And To Our Colleagues In The Music Industry

Read a letter from the Academy's Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees

Recording Academy/Feb 16, 2018 - 01:16 am

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

The Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees is attuned to the calls to action that have resonated ever since the 60th GRAMMY Awards. We recognize the impact of the unfortunate choice of words from our President/CEO, Neil Portnow, in a post-GRAMMY interview. In the many letters and statements that we and our Board have received from some of our most respected artists, as well as prominent female and male music business executives, the message is clear: Our Academy and our industry must do a better job honoring and demonstrating our commitment to cultural, gender and genre diversity, in all aspects of our work. 

The Recording Academy is a membership organization, first and foremost. Like all Academy members, our Trustees live and breathe music, and are embedded in the fabric of our industry. Our Board members - many of whom are women - include independent artists, songwriters, touring musicians, producers and engineers, visual and audio entrepreneurs, A&R executives, and music publishers.  Our Vice Chair and former Chair/Chair Emeritus are women, and our National Awards and Nominations, Membership, Advocacy, and Producers & Engineers Wing Steering committees are all chaired or co-chaired by women. We honor the Academy, and we expect nothing less in return than strict adherence to musical excellence, an inclusive and diverse philosophy, meaningful outreach and communication, a purity of purpose, and an eagerness to embrace change as our musical culture and society evolve

The Academy’s commitment to our community resonates far beyond the nominations, winners and performers on the GRAMMY Awards. MusiCares, the GRAMMY Museum Foundation, and our Advocacy presence in Washington, D.C., speak to how much we care about all the people in our music family, whether they are Academy members or not. Our 12 Chapters nurture new generations of professionals in recording and business, and mentor Governors on our local boards to ally themselves with the issues they are most passionate about. At the heart of what we do, there is mutual respect and the belief that each of us has something unique and valuable to offer. The more diverse we are as an Academy, the better equipped we are to champion our members and our community.

The GRAMMY Awards have always been a positive and negative flashpoint and will likely continue to be because of the ever-changing nature of our world. We are constantly striving to reflect genre, gender, and ethnic diversity in our categories and fields. We welcome proposals from our members to make changes, and we debate all worthy ideas at an annual meeting dedicated solely to this purpose. Likewise, we have worked hard to ensure that our eligibility requirements reflect changing distribution methods. The advent of online voting and the ability to offer audio streams of nominated titles has been designed to make the voting experience convenient, while not compromising security.

The Academy is a thriving, fluid environment. It has a powerful agenda to do good work intended to improve the lives of those who create music, and to ensure that we respectfully participate in a culture where creativity can flourish.  We look to our industry partners to provide opportunities for music creators to maintain their professional careers. We embrace the idea that with the help and support of dedicated artists and professionals, we will undertake a fresh, honest appraisal of the role of women in all aspects of our Academy and the industry at large, with the hope of inspiring positive change.

Our Board of Trustees is committed to creating a comprehensive task force that will take a deep look at these issues and make material recommendations on how we can all do better. We are pleased that our task force announcement has been well received, with many people offering to participate in work that will yield tangible results. As we continue to take the appropriate time needed to ensure that this action is well-conceived and properly developed, we ask you to remember what this is about: improving our community and creating opportunity for all.  If we achieve this goal, we will all look back at this moment as one that has helped reshape the fabric of our industry. 

Please be assured that the Executive Committee and our Board of Trustees holds all the Academy’s leadership to the highest standards. We respect and deeply appreciate the opinions of the artists and industry leaders who have spoken up since the GRAMMY Awards. We cherish the trust that you have in the Recording Academy, and pledge to honor this transformational moment of gender equality as we continue to recognize musical excellence, advocate for the well-being of music makers, and ensure that music remains an indelible part of our culture.

Respectfully,

The Executive Committee on behalf of the Board of Trustees
The Recording Academy

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GRAMMYs On The Hill Honorees Named

Legendary artist and producer Quincy Jones — 27-time GRAMMY winner and The Recording Academy's ambassador for its 50th Celebration — will headline a day of music advocacy as part of The Academy's GRAMMYs on The Hill activities in the nation's

Recording Academy/Dec 3, 2014 - 05:06 am

Quincy Jones, Sen. Ted Kennedy and Rep. Marsha Blackburn to be saluted

GRAMMY.com

Legendary artist and producer Quincy Jones — 27-time GRAMMY winner and The Recording Academy's ambassador for its 50th Celebration — will headline a day of music advocacy as part of The Academy's GRAMMYs on The Hill activities in the nation's capital on Sept. 5, it was announced today by The Recording Academy.

Events will include a unique afternoon jam session with GRAMMY-winning artist Keb' Mo' and members of Congress. Later that evening at an awards gala, Jones will be honored for his lifelong contributions to American music, and honorees Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) will be recognized for their legislative support of the arts and music creators.

Among the luminaries joining Keb' Mo' to salute the honorees will be four-time GRAMMY winner and Recording Academy Chair Jimmy Jam, Academy President Neil Portnow, nine-time GRAMMY winner Ray Benson (of Asleep At The Wheel), "Godfather of Go-Go" Chuck Brown, GRAMMY-winning songwriter Brett James ("Jesus Take The Wheel"), country superstar John Rich (of Big & Rich), four-time GRAMMY winner BeBe Winans and seven-time GRAMMY winner CeCe Winans.

"GRAMMYs on the Hill connects top music makers — from singers and songwriters to producers and engineers — with members of Congress in Washington to shed light on the effect music has in enriching our lives," said Portnow. "This year, as part of our 50th Celebration activities, we will highlight the importance of music preservation and education so that it continues to thrive in our culture for years to come."

Throughout the day, more than 120 music professionals from across the country will come to Washington to speak to legislators about promoting policies that improve the environment for music and its makers. Earlier in the day on Capitol Hill, the GRAMMY Foundation will showcase its programs with a special performance by Keb' Mo', who will jam with members of the Recording Arts and Sciences Congressional Caucus (the "Congressional GRAMMY Band" — a group of musician members of Congress who have informally jammed at previous Academy advocacy events) in the Cannon House Office Building Caucus Room on Capitol Hill.

That evening, GRAMMYs on the Hill will move to the ballroom of the Willard Inter-Continental Hotel for its 7th annual gala dinner where The Recording Academy will honor Jones, Sen. Kennedy and Rep. Blackburn. Chesnee High School of South Carolina will receive the GRAMMY Foundation's Signature School Award and Scholarship for its outstanding commitment to music education.

For more information, please click here and here.

 

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Neil Portnow's 49th GRAMMYs Telecast Remarks

Recording Academy/Dec 3, 2014 - 05:06 am
What if the GRAMMYs had to give up the Best New Artist category because there weren't any? Well, as long as The Recording Academy has anything to say about it, that's not going to happen! Tonight, we've already met some of this year's remarkable Best New Artist nominees, and in a few minutes, we'll see a fresh new face experience her "ultimate" GRAMMY Moment provided by The Academy.
 
When I was just 6 years old, I watched Elvis on TV, and knew what I wanted to do with my life. And thanks to my parents and the dedicated music teachers at school, I realized my dream of a career in music. Now, we need to make sure that others have that same chance.
 
Let me show you exactly what I'm talking about. Meet Anne Lee, a very talented 15-year-old public school music student, and Christian Sands, a 17 year old who won a spot in our GRAMMY Jazz Ensemble.
 
Our GRAMMY Foundation programs like GRAMMY in the Schools and GRAMMY Camp teach and encourage thousands of kids who love music, and whose lives are better for it. This underscores the most fundamental point — every child deserves exposure to music and the arts in school!
 
There are some encouraging signs out there. Just this year, The Recording Academy and the music community rallied their forces here in California to reverse the trend of reduced funding. The result: more than 100 million dollars for music education with millions more for instruments in schools.
 
The time is now to contact your elected leaders. Tell them that music is just as essential to the next generation's development as any other subject. We'll make it easy for you — go to GRAMMY.com. We'll connect you directly to your representatives so your voice can be heard.
 
You're here — or out there — because music is an important part of your life. Together let us all ensure that music stays just as vital and alive for generations still to come.
Your New Membership Portal Is Here!

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Your New Membership Portal Is Here!

Visit the new Recording Academy membership area now

Recording Academy/Apr 25, 2018 - 02:31 am

In the Recording Academy’s ongoing efforts to provide a better digital experience for members and supporters, we are streamlining various Academy websites used to access important information about what we do across the organization. This includes an all-new membership area, which replaces GRAMMYPro.com and provides members easier access to news and content across the Academy, Chapter information and updates, and membership account management.
 
Visit the new membership area by clicking this link: www.grammy.com/membership.
 
All GRAMMYPro.com links redirect to GRAMMY.com. Log in using the email associated with your Recording Academy account (the same one that you used to access GRAMMYPro.com). If you have forgotten your password, you can reset it here: https://www.grammy.com/user/password.
 
When you’re logged in, you can visit your Dashboard to:

  • Review and update your Contact Information
  • Review and update your Mailing Preferences
  • Change your profile photo
  • Explore events, member discounts, and content across the Recording Academy

If you experience any issues, please email membership@grammy.com or call the Membership Team at 310.392.3777.